INTRODUCTION - THINKING LONGER AND HARDER

(- Copyright 2016 by Mike Stewart -)

When I worked for IBM, the corporate motto was "Think". As I have grown older, I appreciate more and more the importance of "Thinking Longer and Harder".

There was a time when I liked Science Fiction. This book suggests some interesting Science Fiction.

There was a time when I found insects and biology fascinating. This book speculates on how life developed.

There was a time when I was interested in the stock market. I learned a lot of useless things. I was not writing then. This is not a book about the stock market.

There was a time when I was interested in the physical sciences, everything from the smallest atom to the vast universe. And beyond. This book is definitely influenced by this time.

There was a very long time when I was interested in business. The relationship between people and technology is complex and intriguing. What I have written in this book about people and the internet could make you a better salesman and financially more successful.

Now is the time I want to write about many things. Perhaps too many things.

Chapter 1, Time is of the Essence, bridges the gap between business and the rest of Reality. Readers who only want to improve their salesmanship abilities can benefit from some of the subject matter and can ignore the rest. Similarly, if you like to be mentally challenged or made to look at things in a different way, this chapter will start you down this path.

Chapter 2, How People Really Buy, begins the discussion of the buying decision process people go through and how this process has been changed by the Internet.

Chapter 3, True Across All Worldviews, questions what makes people like they are. No matter your profession, you can't know too much about what makes people tick.

Chapter 4, Do I Really Need This is primarily concerned with the unique worldviews of sales prospects, but it also addresses the importance of the worldview of others be they sales professionals, students, scientists, or housewives. This chapter also begins to build the case that the rise of the Internet can affect worldviews.

Chapter 5, Not Quite The Same, is about the importance of common sense. This chapter concentrates on the needs of a specific group of sales professional, the insurance agent.

Chapter 6, Beginning of the Weird, has been influenced by my early love of science. The sales professional may be interested in why I have concluded that scientists are dumber than marketing experts. This chapter is a history, summarizing how science, in my worldview, has been transformed from logical to philosophical.

Chapter 7, What Does It Cost, details how all creatures are always calculating the costs of their actions. In the case of the sales prospect, pointing out the cost of no action is the first step toward the sales professional's success.

Chapter 8, Is This Guy Competent, describes the unique problems of another group of sales professionals, the people who work in the Financial Services Industry. These people include stock brokers, financial advisers, and retirement planners. This chapter also discusses how the Internet makes possible a redefinition of a traditional sales tool, the "Elevator Speech".

Chapter 9, Killing Schrodinger's Cat, is a detour into the world of quantum physics. It points out in an imaginary tale how branding is ever present in life and in sales. This chapter questions whether anyone is really rational. After reading this chapter, you will not be able to talk to a prospect, argue with your spouse, or watch a political campaign without seeing the "cute kitten" and the "old cat" in all of us.

Chapter 10, Overcoming Objections, is a step by step plan to use the Internet to recognize and address objections even before a sales prospect realizes he has objections.

Chapter 11, Know Your Prospect, Know Yourself, delves into the question of why, in business and in life, worldviews often collide. Why, also, is common knowledge usually right, but is, occasionally, spectacularly wrong? When and how do worldviews change?

Chapter 12, Why Wood Bees Can't Sell, covers science (maybe science fiction), philosophy, neural networks, quantum computers, and a host of other things.

Chapter 13, Thinking About Thinking. When our worldview changes, what is important to us changes. What we are is mostly, if not completely, defined by our thoughts. Thinking about what others are thinking can help many of us, no matter what we define as important.

Chapter 14, Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep. Sleeping is important, apparently for several reasons. Sleeping is also very complex. You should read this chapter and then sleep on it. Also, notice the warning at the end of this Introduction.

Chapter 15, Size Doesn't Matter - Or Does It?, tries to explore the complex world of String Theory to see if we can really say something is big, small, or whatever.

Chapter 16, My String Theory Has Knots continues the long journey, detouring into an unprecedented, detailed examination of the Big Bang Theory. On this journey, we become aware of the biggest problem facing physics today, one that has dogged mankind for centuries. This is what I call the "Turtle Problem" - and we offer a possible solution.

Chapter 17, The Turtle Problem. We take a closer look at theories or ideas supported by the Scientific Establishment. Included are classical physics, quantum mechanics, the Big Bang Theory, Quantum Loop Gravity, Cause and Effect, and the String Theory. All of these, to the extent that they depend on the stated or assumed idea that time exists, may be completely false. We also point out that any future theories must address the turtle problem.

Chapter 18, A Big Bang, Our Big Bang. If the Experts are right, they may have proved themselves wrong. And if they are wrong, the foundations of science will quiver. In this chapter, we speculate about times and universes and conclude that time is extremely relative. And the relativity of time explains a lot. And, finally, we realize we can never stop Thinking Longer and Harder.

There is another Chapter I could have written. If I had written this chapter, I would have named it "Squishy Systems". One of the definitions of Squishy is: "not firm, steady, or fixed". I could have written a lot about squishy systems. Instead, I will just give three examples. The Stock Market is a Squishy System. Commercial Search Engines are Squishy Systems. Everyone's mind is a Squishy System.

This Book reveals my conclusions about sales and marketing and how it has been, will be, and can be affected by the Internet. But this Book also reveals much more - my total Worldview of Reality.

I feel that my Worldview is correct and logical. I believe you have a different Worldview and your Reality is different than mine.

We are both right. Or maybe we are both wrong.

We all want to be important. We all want to feel important. Yet, what if we had to list, in order of importance, from most to least, one thousand things, ideas, or values. I doubt if any two people in the world would produce identical lists.

I could feel important if I could think of one thought or one idea that no one has thought of before (by this I mean what I and a lot of other people would consider a substantial thought - not silly thoughts like "Would George Washington have become President if he had had Rudolph the Reindeer's bright and shiny nose?").

My task is made more difficult by the fact that hundreds of millions of thoughts are created every second. A thought would have to be "outside the box" or on some level strange, to have a chance at being unique. On the other hand, a thought that is almost completely false or based on facts that are not true could still qualify if it contained a small kernel of truth.

This book is an attempt to find a unique thought. Even if it fails this task, however, it may still be the only place to find discussions of a number of rarely expressed thoughts and theories about Life and Reality. Or it may just teach you to sell better.

WARNING: DON'T READ THIS BOOK WHILE SLEEPY. The ideas discussed are understandable, but complex. An alert mind is required.

More THINKING LONGER AND HARDER. - Mike Stewart. - mike@esearchfor.com

INTRODUCTION - THINKING LONGER AND HARDER

 

 
 

(- Copyright 2016 by Mike Stewart -)

When I worked for IBM, the corporate motto was "Think". As I have grown older, I appreciate more and more the importance of "Thinking Longer and Harder".

There was a time when I liked Science Fiction. This book suggests some interesting Science Fiction.

There was a time when I found insects and biology fascinating. This book speculates on how life developed.

There was a time when I was interested in the stock market. I learned a lot of useless things. I was not writing then. This is not a book about the stock market.

There was a time when I was interested in the physical sciences, everything from the smallest atom to the vast universe. And beyond. This book is definitely influenced by this time.

There was a very long time when I was interested in business. The relationship between people and technology is complex and intriguing. What I have written in this book about people and the internet could make you a better salesman and financially more successful.

Now is the time I want to write about many things. Perhaps too many things.

Chapter 1, Time is of the Essence, bridges the gap between business and the rest of Reality. Readers who only want to improve their salesmanship abilities can benefit from some of the subject matter and can ignore the rest. Similarly, if you like to be mentally challenged or made to look at things in a different way, this chapter will start you down this path.

Chapter 2, How People Really Buy, begins the discussion of the buying decision process people go through and how this process has been changed by the Internet.

Chapter 3, True Across All Worldviews, questions what makes people like they are. No matter your profession, you can't know too much about what makes people tick.

Chapter 4, Do I Really Need This is primarily concerned with the unique worldviews of sales prospects, but it also addresses the importance of the worldview of others be they sales professionals, students, scientists, or housewives. This chapter also begins to build the case that the rise of the Internet can affect worldviews.

Chapter 5, Not Quite The Same, is about the importance of common sense. This chapter concentrates on the needs of a specific group of sales professional, the insurance agent.

Chapter 6, Beginning of the Weird, has been influenced by my early love of science. The sales professional may be interested in why I have concluded that scientists are dumber than marketing experts. This chapter is a history, summarizing how science, in my worldview, has been transformed from logical to philosophical.

Chapter 7, What Does It Cost, details how all creatures are always calculating the costs of their actions. In the case of the sales prospect, pointing out the cost of no action is the first step toward the sales professional's success.

Chapter 8, Is This Guy Competent, describes the unique problems of another group of sales professionals, the people who work in the Financial Services Industry. These people include stock brokers, financial advisers, and retirement planners. This chapter also discusses how the Internet makes possible a redefinition of a traditional sales tool, the "Elevator Speech".

Chapter 9, Killing Schrodinger's Cat, is a detour into the world of quantum physics. It points out in an imaginary tale how branding is ever present in life and in sales. This chapter questions whether anyone is really rational. After reading this chapter, you will not be able to talk to a prospect, argue with your spouse, or watch a political campaign without seeing the "cute kitten" and the "old cat" in all of us.

Chapter 10, Overcoming Objections, is a step by step plan to use the Internet to recognize and address objections even before a sales prospect realizes he has objections.

Chapter 11, Know Your Prospect, Know Yourself, delves into the question of why, in business and in life, worldviews often collide. Why, also, is common knowledge usually right, but is, occasionally, spectacularly wrong? When and how do worldviews change?

Chapter 12, Why Wood Bees Can't Sell, covers science (maybe science fiction), philosophy, neural networks, quantum computers, and a host of other things.

Chapter 13, Thinking About Thinking. When our worldview changes, what is important to us changes. What we are is mostly, if not completely, defined by our thoughts. Thinking about what others are thinking can help many of us, no matter what we define as important.

Chapter 14, Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep"". Sleeping is important, apparently for several reasons. Sleeping is also very complex. You should read this chapter and then sleep on it. Also, notice the warning at the end of this Introduction.

Chapter 15, Size Doesn't Matter - Or Does It?, tries to explore the complex world of String Theory to see if we can really say something is big, small, or whatever.

Chapter 16, My String Theory Has Knots continues the long journey, detouring into an unprecedented, detailed examination of the Big Bang Theory. On this journey, we become aware of the biggest problem facing physics today, one that has dogged mankind for centuries. This is what I call the "Turtle Problem" - and we offer a possible solution.

Chapter 17, The Turtle Problem. We take a closer look at theories or ideas supported by the Scientific Establishment. Included are classical physics, quantum mechanics, the Big Bang Theory, Quantum Loop Gravity, Cause and Effect, and the String Theory. All of these, to the extent that they depend on the stated or assumed idea that time exists, may be completely false. We also point out that any future theories must address the turtle problem.

Chapter 18, A Big Bang, Our Big Bang. If the Experts are right, they may have proved themselves wrong. And if they are wrong, the foundations of science will quiver. In this chapter, we speculate about times and universes and conclude that time is extremely relative. And the relativity of time explains a lot. And, finally, we realize we can never stop Thinking Longer and Harder.

There is another Chapter I could have written. If I had written this chapter, I would have named it "Squishy Systems". One of the definitions of Squishy is: "not firm, steady, or fixed". I could have written a lot about squishy systems. Instead, I will just give three examples. The Stock Market is a Squishy System. Commercial Search Engines are Squishy Systems. Everyone's mind is a Squishy System.

This Book reveals my conclusions about sales and marketing and how it has been, will be, and can be affected by the Internet. But this Book also reveals much more - my total Worldview of Reality.

I feel that my Worldview is correct and logical. I believe you have a different Worldview and your Reality is different than mine.

We are both right. Or maybe we are both wrong.

We all want to be important. We all want to feel important. Yet, what if we had to list, in order of importance, from most to least, one thousand things, ideas, or values. I doubt if any two people in the world would produce identical lists.

I could feel important if I could think of one thought or one idea that no one has thought of before (by this I mean what I and a lot of other people would consider a substantial thought - not silly thoughts like "Would George Washington have become President if he had had Rudolph the Reindeer's bright and shiny nose?").

My task is made more difficult by the fact that hundreds of millions of thoughts are created every second. A thought would have to be "outside the box" or on some level strange, to have a chance at being unique. On the other hand, a thought that is almost completely false or based on facts that are not true could still qualify if it contained a small kernel of truth.

This book is an attempt to find a unique thought. Even if it fails this task, however, it may still be the only place to find discussions of a number of rarely expressed thoughts and theories about Life and Reality. Or it may just teach you to sell better.

WARNING: DON'T READ THIS BOOK WHILE SLEEPY. The ideas discussed are understandable, but complex. An alert mind is required.

More THINKING LONGER AND HARDER. - Mike Stewart - mike@esearchfor.com